Monday, November 24, 2014

Fall convocation recognizes achievements at OSU; Brorsen earns top faculty award

 

Oklahoma State University celebrated excellence by recognizing the achievements of faculty, staff and administrators at the University Awards Convocation Tuesday at the OSU ConocoPhillips Alumni Center in Stillwater.
OSU President Burns Hargis with Dr. Wade Brorsen, Regents Professor of Agricultural Economics in the Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources
The Eminent Faculty Award, which recognizes the highest level of scholarly achievement at OSU, was presented to Wade Brorsen, Regents Professor of Agricultural Economics in the Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources. Brorsen has made outstanding contributions to the field of agricultural economics through his research program, award-winning teaching and professional service as an editor of two of the profession’s top journals.
“Dr. Brorsen has been a leader in agricultural price analysis for more than 30 years and has made innovative and path-breaking contributions in a number of areas, including price discovery in commodity markets, efficiency of commodity markets, the impact of risk and the marketing behaviors of farmers,” said Dr. Gary Sandefur, OSU provost and senior vice president.
Earlier this year, Brorsen was named a fellow by the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, an honor bestowed on less than one percent of the association’s membership.
The Loyal and True award, which personifies the spirit of OSU through unwavering devotion, personal sacrifice and commitment of time and talents, went to Dr. Gary Trennepohl, who has served as the president of OSU-Tulsa and former dean of the OSU College of Business (now Spears School of Business).  Trennepohl has co-authored two college level textbooks and more than 30 professional journal articles.
The full list of honorees:
Phoenix Award for Graduate Faculty
Sundara Madihally, Associate Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology.
President’s Cup for Creative Interdisciplinarity
First Place – Center for Wearable Electronic Sensing Systems and Technologies
Team leader: Bruce Benjamin, Associate Dean and Interim vice Provost of Biomedical Sciences at the Center for Health Sciences
Second Place – Interdisciplinary Program in Regenerative Medicine at OSU
Team leader: Lin Liu, Professor of Psychological Sciences at the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences
Third Place – OSU and Choctaw Nation: Collaborate and Educate
Team leader: Pamela Sissi Carroll, Professor and Dean of the College of Education
Regents Distinguished Research Award
Jeanmarie Verchot, Professor of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources
Jiahong Wu, Regents Professor of Mathematics, College of Arts and Sciences
Larry Mullins, Regents Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences
Tyler Ley, Associate Professor of Civil and Environments Engineering, College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology
Murat Hancer, Professor of Hotel and Restaruant Administration, College of Human Sciences
Regents Distinguished Teaching Award
Udaya DeSilva, Associate Professor of Animal Science, Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural resources
Jeffrey Walker.  Professor of English, College of Arts and Sciences
Kristen Baum, Associate Professor of Integrative Biology, College of Arts and Sciences
Rick Wilson, Professor and Department Head of Management Science and Information Systems in the Spears School of Business
Juliana Utley, Associate Professor in the School of Teaching and Curriculum Leadership, College of Education
Edralin Lucas,  Associate Professor of Nutritional Sciences, College of Human Sciences
Melanie Breshears, Associate Professor of Pathobiology at the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences
Kent Smith, Interim Associate Dean and Associate Professor of Anatomy and Cell Biology at the Center for Health Sciences
Merrick Foundation Teaching Award
Liz Roth, Associate Professor of Art, Graphic Design and Art History in the College of Arts and Sciences
Outreach Education Award
Gregory Wilber, Associate Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering in the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology.
International Education Award
Jeffrey Vitale, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics in the Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources
Sigma Xi Young Investigator Award
Janette Steets, Associate Professor in Botany, College of Arts and Sciences
Regents Professors
Francis Epplin, Agricultural Economics, Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources
Edward Jones, English, College of Arts and Sciences
Larry Mullins, Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences
Scott McMurry, Integrative Biology, College of Arts and Sciences
Bret Jacobson, Applied Health and Educational Psychology, College of Education
Gary Yen, Electrical and Computer Engineering, College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology
Excellence in Advising Award
Daniel Stein, Assistant Professor of Animal Science, Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources
Shawn Rose, Senior Academic Counselor, Student Success Center, College of Arts and Sciences
Larry Mullins, Regents Professor of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences
Abigail Minch, Senior Academic Counselor, Student Success Center, Spears School of Business
Tiffany Henry, Senior Academic Counselor, Student Success Center, College of Education
Laura Price, Academic counselor, Student Success Center, College of Human Sciences
Kelly Kavalier, Senior Academic Counselor, Learning and Student Success Opportunity Center, Division of Academic Affairs
Debra Danley, Information Assistant, Department of Animal Science, Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources
Julie Koch, Associate Professor, School of Applied Health and Educational Psychology, College of Education
Anna Teague, Admissions Recruitment Coordinator in the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences
Joshua Ramsey, Associate Professor, Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology
Land-Grant Awards For Excellence
Joe Cecil, Industrial Engineering and Management, College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology
Rebecca Damron, English, College of Arts and Sciences
David Peters, Special Collections and Archives, Edmon Low Library
Leave the Ladder Down Award
Federico Aime, Associate Professor of Management, Spears School of Business
Debra Danley, Information Assistant, Animal Science
University Service Award
Clinton Krehbiel, Assistant Department Head and Regents Professor, Department of Animal Science
Elizabeth Grubgeld, English, College of Arts and Sciences
Emily Cooper, Quality Assurance Development Coordinator, Oklahoma Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences
Eminent Faculty Award
Wade Brorsen, Regents Professor of Agricultural Economics in the Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources
Loyal and True Award
Gary Trennepohl, Professor, Spears School of Business
Story by Alex Marianos

Monday, November 10, 2014

Veterans Day (from wikipedia)

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For other uses, see Veterans Day (disambiguation).
Veterans Day
Veterans day.jpg
Joseph Ambrose, an 86-year-old World War I veteran, attends the dedication day parade for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in 1982, holding the flag that covered the casket of his son, who was killed in the Korean War.
Observed by United States
Type National
Date November 11
Next time 11 November 2014
Frequency annual
Related to Armistice Day, Remembrance Day, Memorial Day
Veterans Day is an official United States holiday that honors people who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces, also known as veterans. It is a federal holiday that is observed on November 11. It coincides with other holidays such as Armistice Day and Remembrance Day, which are celebrated in other parts of the world and also mark the anniversary of the end of World War I (major hostilities of World War I were formally ended at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, when the Armistice with Germany went into effect). The United States also originally observed Armistice Day; it then evolved into the current Veterans Day holiday in 1954.
Veterans Day is not to be confused with Memorial Day; Veterans Day celebrates the service of all U.S. military veterans, while Memorial Day is a day of remembering the men and women who died while serving.[1]
Most sources spell Veterans as a simple plural without a possessive apostrophe (Veteran's or Veterans').

History

U.S. President Woodrow Wilson first proclaimed Armistice Day for November 11, 1919. In proclaiming the holiday, he said
"To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country's service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations."[2]
The United States Congress passed a concurrent resolution seven years later on June 4, 1926, requesting that President Calvin Coolidge issue another proclamation to observe November 11 with appropriate ceremonies.[2] A Congressional Act (52 Stat. 351; 5 U.S. Code, Sec. 87a) approved May 13, 1938, made the 11th of November in each year a legal holiday: "a day to be dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be thereafter celebrated and known as 'Armistice Day'."[3]
In 1945, World War II veteran Raymond Weeks from Birmingham, Alabama, had the idea to expand Armistice Day to celebrate all veterans, not just those who died in World War I. Weeks led a delegation to Gen. Dwight Eisenhower, who supported the idea of National Veterans Day. Weeks led the first national celebration in 1947 in Alabama and annually until his death in 1985. President Reagan honored Weeks at the White House with the Presidential Citizenship Medal in 1982 as the driving force for the national holiday. Elizabeth Dole, who prepared the briefing for President Reagan, determined Weeks as the "Father of Veterans Day."
U.S. Representative Ed Rees from Emporia, Kansas, presented a bill establishing the holiday through Congress. President Dwight D. Eisenhower, also from Kansas, signed the bill into law on May 26, 1954.[4]
Congress amended this act on June 1, 1954, replacing "Armistice" with "Veterans," and it has been known as Veterans Day since.[5][6]
The National Veterans Award, created in 1954, also started in Birmingham. Congressman Rees of Kansas was honored in Alabama as the first recipient of the award for his support offering legislation to make Veterans Day a federal holiday, which marked nine years of effort by Raymond Weeks. Weeks conceived the idea in 1945, petitioned Gen. Eisenhower in 1946, and led the first Veterans Day celebration in 1947 (keeping the official name Armistice Day until Veterans Day was legal in 1954).
Although originally scheduled for celebration on November 11 of every year, starting in 1971 in accordance with the Uniform Monday Holiday Act, Veterans Day was moved to the fourth Monday of October. In 1978, it was moved back to its original celebration on November 11. While the legal holiday remains on November 11, if that date happens to be on a Saturday or Sunday, then organizations that formally observe the holiday will normally be closed on the adjacent Friday or Monday, respectively.

Observance

Because it is a federal holiday, some American workers and many students have Veterans Day off from work or school. When Veterans Day falls on a Saturday then either Saturday or the preceding Friday may be designated as the holiday, whereas if it falls on a Sunday it is typically observed on the following Monday. A Society for Human Resource Management poll in 2010 found that 21 percent of employers planned to observe the holiday in 2011.[7]
Non-essential federal government offices are closed. No mail is delivered. All federal workers are paid for the holiday; those who are required to work on the holiday sometimes receive holiday pay for that day in addition to their wages.
In his Armistice Day address to Congress, Wilson was sensitive to the psychological toll of the lean War years: "Hunger does not breed reform; it breeds madness," he remarked. [8] As Veterans Day and the birthday of the United States Marine Corps (November 10, 1775) are only one day apart, that branch of the Armed Forces customarily observes both occasions as a 96-hour liberty period.

Spelling of Veterans Day

While the holiday is commonly printed as Veteran's Day or Veterans' Day in calendars and advertisements (spellings that are grammatically acceptable), the United States government has declared that the attributive (no apostrophe) rather than the possessive case is the official spelling.[9]

See also

Veterans Day 2013 Poster